Thursday, March 19, 2009

Henry, Thomas, Bill

Bill, Thomas, Bill, Thomas, Henry, Matt, Bill, Michael, Michael, Michael, Zach, Zach, Paul, Henry, Thomas, Michael, Anonymous, Matt, Bill, Don...

Are women allergic to comment streams?

9 comments:

Gary B. Fitzgerald said...

Maybe they just have more sense.

Chien Bâtard said...

Yes, or less time. Or both.

m said...

As a devout lurker and a mother with two kids under three, for me it's mostly time. I feel rude if I'm going to drop into a conversation and leave. I often don't have the time to keep up on comments.

Also, I just don't have the energy to keep up on the defence/offence some conversations require.

Chien Bâtard said...

It's true. The level of attack can be ferocious and for many people the emotional toll it takes isn't worth it. For those who thrive on that kind of confrontation however, that is just sissy, isn't it? Buck up. Build your argument or get out of the discussion...

Icky.

VanessaP said...

Is it my especially baritone voice that's misleading, my air of authority, or is it the penis again?

m said...

Exactly. And I'd much rather have an intense discussion face-to-face. You can disagree all you want, but clink glasses at the end and never leave with hurt feelings.

Shawna Lemay said...

I wonder about anonymous...

There's the interruption factor as well. As soon as I open the comment box - an interruption (for interruptions there will always be...) Crazy how often this happens.

Amanda said...

my real name is henry.

Chien Bâtard said...

Henry is good.

Glass clinking is good too.

The relationship to militaristic language and criticism is not a coincidence. There are those who see criticism as a form of attack. They see their turf as in need of defense. They want to "take down" the other...

This is not new...and I find it interesting that the notion of the negative doesn't actually get complicated in terms of the discussion of or challenging of certain ideas and implications in poetry and thinking. What is actually a negative? Is trying to point out a trend in poetry the way that Michael Shaivo did, negative? I'm not sure. It takes a lot of guts to ask those questions, particularly in relation to a poet so embraced by the mainstream, or those who can write checks...

In any case, another odd strand to this discussion and the silencing of "other" voices in comment streams is the fact that those very people who purport to think the negative should be the norm are often the ones who cry the loudest and the most defensively when the slightest critique is even remotely directed at them.