Tuesday, August 24, 2010

Against Micro Moments

We steal text. We manipulate it. We copy and assemble. We Tweet before we've fully formed our thoughts. We make lists of Best/Worst Over/Under Rated. We. Operate. In. Bites. We can't seem to give ourselves space to,

what?

to

what? 

think.

This is your brain on computers:
...technology makes the tiniest windows of time entertaining, and potentially productive. But scientists point to an unanticipated side effect: when people keep their brains busy with digital input, they are forfeiting downtime that could allow them to better learn and remember information, or come up with new ideas.
I love technology. Really, I do. But I can't quite believe the hours we all spend Tweeting back and forth. Myself included. When I recall that for years I wouldn't have cable in my house because I didn't want to be a consumer of culture but rather a producer, it all seems so quaint.

How many hours do you spend in front of a computer?

How many productive hours?

9 comments:

Chris said...

Let me ask a question, though, perhaps hypothetical.

"I didn't want to be a consumer of culture but rather a producer".

What is production without consumption? What are you producing, for who, and why? What happens to the end project, if it doesn't get consumed? There is so much culture that has been produced but is ignored (that is, unconsumed) (at least, using the model of "consumption" that you seem to be using here).

Perhaps the real problem isn't the consumption, but that so much consumption (eating) and production (pooping) is happening without digestion (digestion).

Lemon Hound said...

Well, I said it was a tv-related thought which means it came out of pre-Internet gesture at keeping a flood of other people's production out of my creation space.

How does that work now?

Oh, right, there is no distinction.

Lemon Hound said...

Chris, you just love to get pooping in to a posts, don't you?

;-)

Chris said...

I was reading this moralizing medieval poem today, and it had a bit -- a pretty typical bit -- advising the reader not to hang around immoral people. Lest the reader be tainted by their immorality. Which your comment about wanting to keep your creative space uncontaminated (imperfectly) reminded me of.

But I thought, isn't the whole Christian message supposed to be to go out among the lowest of the low and break bread with them? Isn't that what Christ did, isn't that what the imitation of Christ would guide you to? But I'm no theologian (or, you know, Christian) so what do I know.

I guess I can see the value of both sides -- of the poet going deep into the social morass (and drowning, or ego-drowning, within it), or of the poet creating a space outside of the social morass (oxygenating an underwater bubble) -- or any number of other sides -- but perhaps we've been drowning a lot for the past decade or so, perhaps we are sodden and weary?

I do like poop-based statements of poetics, maybe. They smell honest.

Lemon Hound said...

Well, I don't think I can be accused of tossing out the money lenders and turning a blind eye to my moment...

The point is, we've let this thing in that really doesn't lend itself to being turned off, or slowed down.

On a bad day I think I'm just peddling juice for the likes of Jobs and the other 21 year old billionaire social networking geniuses of the world.

Chris said...

"The point is, we've let this thing in that really doesn't lend itself to being turned off, or slowed down."

What, humanity?

Lemon Hound said...

No. Poop.

pam said...

I sense a call here for a decelerated time & attentiveness. Lately I've been trying to unplug and spend more un-atomized time with the animals in my life. No insult intended to their human counterparts, but bird tweets and cat poop have proved to be remarkably fertile and generative for the imagination, quite apart from the distractions of info-technology.

[word ver: notinif]

pam said...

I sense a call here for some decelerated time & attentiveness. Lately I've been trying to unplug more and spend more un-atomized time with the animals in my life. No insult intended to their human counterparts, but bird tweets and cat poop have proved to be remarkably fertile and generative for the imagination, quite apart from the distractions of info-technology.

[word ver: notinif]