Tuesday, September 27, 2011

Aspect Ratio

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Ongoing series of Montreal shots, particularly focusing on the northeast corner of the plateau.

Wednesday, September 21, 2011

Roddy Doyle comes to Concordia

October 7, 2011
7:30 p.m.
BMO Amphitheatre, MB 1.210
John Molson School of Business Building
1450 Guy St., Montreal

Writers Read at Concordia in collaboration with The School of Canadian Irish Studies welcomes Irish writer Roddy Doyle. One of Ireland’s most successful and accomplished contemporary writers, he has written plays, stories, children’s literature and novels, most notably The Commitments, The Van, A Star Called Henry, and The Woman Who Walked into Doors. Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha won the prestigious Man Booker Prize in 2003. Several of his novels have been made into highly successful films.

Registration not required.

For more information:
514-848-2424 ext. 8711
cdnirish.concordia.ca
english.concordia.ca/writersread
cdnirish@alcor.concordia.ca

Tuesday, September 06, 2011

‘Monoceros’ by Suzette Mayr

I've been lamenting the lack of energy in Canadian fiction of late. The pace can be glacial, the gaze insular, as if by slowing time down a writer can amplify very little and make it seem about something huge. It's not just a matter of canvas, it's a matter of perspective, and of pace. Suzette Mayr seems to understand this, and she offers up a thinking, introspective, yet fast paced novel.

Following the trail of sorrow in the aftermath of a young gay high school student at a Catholic high school, Mayr moves from character to character, tracing the impact, big and small, on the community that has played host to the dead boy. She doesn't wallow, she shows people in action, attempting to deal with the situation. She has some fun while she's at it, showing up slantly, in drag, as the fabulous Crepe Suzette.

There is nothing precious here, just great storytelling, and, as one reader said, great integrity. Each character is given ample room to show his or her character, equally, without judgement. there is no finger pointing, though there is a high level of frustration with characters who seem to have missed the enormous gains in civil rights that has occurred in the past forty years... It's a reminder that no matter how many gains gays, lesbians, or any "other" in our society might make, for a lot of people, stepping out of the narrow and safe closet of convention, is more difficult than ever.













Coach House | 280 pages | $20.95 | paper | ISBN #978-1552452417